Meaningful ageing seminar challenges providers to deliver culture change

Delivering holistic care in a CDC environment and strategies for challenging pervasive ageism are some of the key topics to be tackled at an upcoming sector event.

Delivering holistic care in a CDC environment and strategies for challenging pervasive ageism are some of the key topics to be discussed at an upcoming sector event.

Meaningful Ageing Australia (formerly PASCOP) is hosting a meaningful ageing seminar in Melbourne next month for aged care service providers and those involved in the care of older people.

Kay Horgan, aged care consultant and founder of AgeWorks, will present on how aged care organisations can be leaders in holistic health. Ms Horgan has recently authored a book, Mission Possibility – a leader’s guide to aged care.

Dr Catherine Barrett will discuss practical strategies for promoting the safety wellbeing of older people by challenging ageism. Dr Barrett has launched two national projects this year; The Tea Cosy project, which challenges ageism, builds respect for older people and prevents elder abuse, and the OPAL Institute, which promotes awareness of older people’s sexual rights.

Kerry Whitlock from Uniting AgeWell will discuss the implementation of the organisation’s AgeWell Palliate program across its residential and community programs. A new component to the program is UA Namaste, which offers support to clients nearing the end of life or with advanced dementia.

The seminar takes place 1 July 9am-12:30pm.

For more information or to register visit the Meaningful Ageing Australia website.

Tags: AgeWorks, catherine-barrett, meaningful-ageing-australia, news-ccrn-3, palliative care, spirituality, training, Uniting AgeWell,

1 thought on “Meaningful ageing seminar challenges providers to deliver culture change

  1. The trouble is aging doesn’t becoming meaningful until you see yourself as going through this process. What someone believes would be the case in their 30’s would see it totally different to someone in their 70’s. The more we get consumers to take control of their care and enforce this, the better the outcomes will be for consumers, not organisations.

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